IIE Blog Opening Minds
IIE Blog Opening Minds

Blog posts tagged:

globalization


  • Letter From WISE—International Education Supporting Crises Worldwide

    By: Dr. Allan E. Goodman on Monday, December 1, 2014

    It was a real lesson in globalization. The airplane announcement went something like this:

    "The local authorities have asked us to spray the cabin to prevent the spread of disease by mosquitos. Please do not breathe in if you are allergic to spraying. And due to the recent outbreaks of Ebola, MERS, H1N1, and bird flu, please report to local authorities upon landing if you have any of the following symptoms: ..." You can imagine the list.


  • Is Globalization Good or Bad for International Education?

    By: Jon Grosh on Tuesday, April 8, 2014

    The answer to this question, according to the authors of IIE’s spring 2014 edition of IIENetworker is, “it depends.” While we tend to think of internationalization and globalization as harmonious, even synonymous, this issue of IIE’s biannual magazine makes important distinctions between the two and points out the benefits—along with potential drawbacks—of rapid globalization.

    So how might globalization be bad for international education?


  • Is Study Abroad Essential?

    By: IIE on Friday, October 25, 2013

    As we continue to live in an increasingly globalized world, cross-cultural competence has become an essential skill for succeeding in the global marketplace. Studying abroad is a great way for students to expand their horizons and can open up a world of personal and professional opportunities that will enable those who have the opportunity to study abroad to become effective global citizens. However, some believe that the merits gained from studying abroad aren’t worth the time or cost.


  • The Role of the University in World Society

    By: Dr. Allan E. Goodman on Tuesday, October 16, 2012

    Last week I had the honor of participating at the Qatar Foundation’s WISE Education Leadership Program in Doha, a program that we implement together with the International Association of University Presidents. This program, now in its third year, brings together newly-appointed university presidents, rectors and vice chancellors from developing countries and prepares them to more effectively lead their institutions. This year’s participants came from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Iraq, Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, Palestine, Tanzania, Tunisia, and the Ukraine. They all face common challenges: how to build the capacity of their teaching staff, how to expand access to women, how to develop programs that meet the demands of the job market and that support sustainable national development, and how to operate in fiscal austerity. And some are dealing with the aftermath of war or conflict, and the toll it took on their students and staff.


  • When Will You Find Us an American School That Wants to Build a Branch Campus Here?

    By: Dr. Allan E. Goodman on Monday, October 1, 2012

    Over the past twelve months, IIE has been visited by education officials from nearly all of the countries undergoing transformation because of the so-called Arab/Asian Spring. Each has asked similar questions about access to U.S. higher education. There is an urgent need to provide education for an entire generation (or two) that has been largely isolated. Questions abound about how to apply to U.S. colleges and universities, how to obtain scholarships, and how to bring their English language skills up to acceptable levels.


Previous | Next

Subscribe to Blog



Archive

About Opening Minds

For more than nine decades, the Institute of International Education has been at the forefront of international education. The Opening Minds blog is IIE’s take on how this field continues to change. Here the Institute’s leaders will explore international educational exchange, global student mobility, institutional partnerships, international development, and other topics and trends that are shaping higher education around the world.

Contact

IIE Opening Minds Blog
E-mail: blog@iie.org

Connect with us
facebook flickr twitter youtube