Edwin Munger, geographer and IIE grantee

Fulbright Fellow Edwin Munger

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"One of the joys of being a geographer is that the world is my oyster, world travel my most stimulating teacher."

In 1951, Edwin Munger was pictured in IIE's Annual Report, standing in front of Mt. Kilimanjaro with his wife. Munger was a Fulbright Fellow that year, conducting geographical research in Tanganyika. Since then, Munger has become a world-recognized authority on Africa, traveled to the continent 86 times, and visited every African country. The first Fulbright Fellow to Africa, Munger was a founder-trustee of the African Studies Association and the U.S.-South African Leader Program, a board member of the Institute of Race Relations in South Africa, and, for 14 years, President of the L.S.B. Leakey Foundation, an organization working to increase scientific knowledge and public understanding of human origins and evolution. In 1985, Munger founded the Cape of Good Hope Foundation to help mostly black universities in Southern Africa, and has subsequently sent more than three million dollars worth of books to help those institutions. Munger has amassed a library of over 45,000 volumes on Sub-Saharan Africa, the largest private collection in the U.S. and a unique cultural resource.

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