IIE Blog Opening Minds
IIE Blog Opening Minds
  • "Go Away and Come Back Better:" 100 Travel Bloggers Gather to Support Study Abroad

    By: Daniela Kaisth on Friday, December 12, 2014

    “What does one wear to the White House?” was one tweet I read as I prepared for a truly unique DC event. On Tuesday, December 9, I joined 100 of our country’s most influential travel bloggers—from big players like Yahoo Travel to start-ups like Adventure Girl—for the White House Travel Blogger Summit on Study Abroad and Global Citizenship. For IIE and our colleague organizations, the topic is so close to our hearts: how do we encourage young Americans to study, volunteer, and work abroad?


  • Overcoming Obstacles to Study Abroad: The Fourth “C”

    By: Dr. Allan E. Goodman on Tuesday, December 9, 2014

    This year's CIEE annual conference addressed the "three Cs" that are making it hard for our students to study abroad: Cost, Curriculum, and Culture. It was my privilege to speak at the luncheon, which was then devoted to working groups to come up with ideas on how to reduce obstacles in each area. Many good ideas were reported and will be shared as part of CIEE’s commitment to IIE's Generation Study Abroad initiative, which also included a generous package of $20 million in scholarships and actions designed to help students throughout the United States to take advantage of international opportunities.


  • International Education in the News: 19 Article Picks

    By: Sharon Witherell on Tuesday, December 2, 2014

    If you read the education news during the past two weeks, it was nearly impossible to miss the headlines: international students are coming to the United States in greater numbers, and they are going to more U.S. universities in more U.S. states. More than 1,000 news reports across the country and around the world announced the latest statistics and trends, illustrating the growing impact these students have on the U.S. economy and communities, on the institutions that host them and the American students with whom they live and learn, and on their home countries.


  • Letter From WISE—International Education Supporting Crises Worldwide

    By: Dr. Allan E. Goodman on Monday, December 1, 2014

    It was a real lesson in globalization. The airplane announcement went something like this:

    "The local authorities have asked us to spray the cabin to prevent the spread of disease by mosquitos. Please do not breathe in if you are allergic to spraying. And due to the recent outbreaks of Ebola, MERS, H1N1, and bird flu, please report to local authorities upon landing if you have any of the following symptoms: ..." You can imagine the list.


  • Joint Recommendation for Global Engagement Policies During Ebola Crisis

    By: IIE on Wednesday, November 19, 2014

    IIE joins with AACRAO, NACAC, and NAFSA in sharing with our members the following guidance, as each institution implements policies and practices related to Ebola and other global public health concerns. We welcome your feedback on how these issues are being handled locally and your recommendations for future action.


  • What the Past Tells Us About the Future of Study Abroad

    By: Christine Farrugia on Tuesday, November 18, 2014

    Over the past fifteen years, the number of American students studying abroad has more than doubled. In 1998/99, there were just 129,770 American students studying abroad for academic credit from their home institution, and in 2012/13 that number has grown to 289,408. When you also consider that more than 46,000 American students pursue full degrees abroad and over 15,000 students travel overseas for non-credit work, internships, and volunteering, the current number of U.S. students overseas grows to more than 350,000. What is clear is that American students are increasingly interested in studying abroad and that U.S. higher education institutions are active in providing study abroad experiences for their students.


  • Letter From Kuala Lumpur: What Binds Us Together

    By: Dr. Allan E. Goodman on Friday, November 7, 2014

    "All men are brothers." The sentence came back to me here in the middle of a dinner hosted by the Malaysian-American Commission on Educational Exchange for about 100 Fulbright U.S. English Teaching Assistants soon heading home. The words are from a novel published in China in 1589, Tale of the Water Margin, about what one learns through struggles in a world almost constantly at war. The sentence was later used by Gandhi as part of the title for his book of autobiographical reflections on how many people with many differences could live together if they thought about the aspirations that bound them together.


  • To Host a King

    By: Alexandra Lowe Lees on Monday, October 20, 2014

    On Monday, September 22, 2014, His Majesty the King of Spain began his first official visit to the United States since his proclamation to the throne in June. We were honored and thrilled King Felipe selected the Institute of International Education (IIE) to be his first U.S. public appearance to speak with a select audience, including many U.S. and Spanish students and alumni from the U.S. Department of State’s Fulbright Program. The event focused on academic exchange and collaboration between Spain and the United States and the critical role of international education in addressing world challenges.


  • What Will it Take to Double Study Abroad in [Your State Here]?

    By: Jon Grosh on Monday, October 20, 2014

    Three weeks before IIE's fall Generation Study Abroad commitment deadline, I packed a suitcase full of newly released IIENetworker magazines and flew back to Oregon, my home state. My destination was Idealist.org headquarters in Portland, where PDX Abroad had gathered 26 higher education professionals from Oregon and Washington to hold a Generation Study Abroad Think Tank. The event, which was modeled after IIE's March 2014 roundtable discussion titled "What Will it Take To Double Study Abroad?" was the first such event organized spontaneously.


  • Addressing the Challenges of Global Youth Unemployment: How Alcoa Foundation is Closing the Gap Between Manufacturing Jobs and Talent

    By: Emil Levy on Thursday, October 2, 2014

    A recent episode of NPR’s popular broadcast Morning Edition, deplored the fact that 5.8 million young Americans are neither in school nor work. What’s more, according to the show, in some parts of the United States, “the unemployment rate among 16 to 24 year-olds is more than twice the national unemployment rate, which is currently 6.3 percent.” However, youth unemployment is not only a U.S. problem.


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About Opening Minds

For more than nine decades, the Institute of International Education has been at the forefront of international education. The Opening Minds blog is IIE’s take on how this field continues to change. Here the Institute’s leaders will explore international educational exchange, global student mobility, institutional partnerships, international development, and other topics and trends that are shaping higher education around the world.

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